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Our Stories

Jacob

Jacob's story

Old Princethorpian (2012)

04 Mar

Coming from a single-parent family on a low income, Princethorpe seemed out of my grasp, and yet I was not being challenged at my current school. A family friend made us aware of possible bursaries so we decided to take a look. I remember the special feeling I had upon arriving at Princethorpe and having met the Headmaster, I was convinced that here was a place in which I could flourish.

I passed the exam and a music audition, but being awarded a bursary was the act of generosity that enabled a Princethorpe education to become a reality for me.

I had been interested in medicine as a result of my brother suffering with a neurological condition, and this acted as the impetus for me to apply for medicine at Southampton University. Despite the intense workload, I was always reminded from my time at Princethorpe, that being a well rounded individual really does help and to that end I continued with my music, accompanying the university gospel choir, directing the medics revue, and setting up a medics music society.

After finishing my studies I went on a Medical Elective to Malawi working in a small rural health clinic, then on to Tanzania to work in a mission hospital, before coming back for graduation and my first job as a doctor.

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What was your time at Princethorpe like?

My time at Princethorpe was filled with incredible opportunities and memories. I was heavily involved with music, playing piano and saxophone and singing in the choir.

 
 

How did you find your studies?

I enjoyed a wide-range of studies and without ever feeling ‘pushed’, I always felt encouraged to perform to the best of my ability.

 
 

What does the future hold for you?

Looking to the future, neurology still remains of particular interest to me and after spending time in Malawi, I have the ambition to work as a doctor in sub-Saharan Africa at some stage in my career.

 
 

What are you doing now?

I graduated from university in summer 2018 and have since started as a first foundation doctor at Dorset County Hospital in Dorchester. I am working four month rotations in Acute Medicine, Cardiology, General Surgery, Intensive Care, General Practice and Emergency Medicine.

 
 

 

  • Being awarded a bursary was the act of generosity that enabled a Princethorpe education to become a reality for me.

    Jacob Stone
    Old Princethorpian 2012